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The People Under the Stairs: Collector’s Edition Blu-Ray Review

Blu-Ray Review- The People Under the Stairs

Distributor: Scream Factory

Street Date: August 11th 2015

Technical Specifications: 1080P Video, Color, 1.85:1 Aspect Ratio, 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio

Runtime: 103 Minutes

The People Under the Stairs: Collector's Edition (Scream Factory)

The People Under the Stairs: Collector’s Edition (Scream Factory)

The Film:

“In every neighborhood, there is a house that adults whisper about, and children cross the street to avoid.” –Theatrical tagline for The People Under the Stairs

The People Under the Stairs is not only one of Wes Craven’s very best films; I consider it a modern day Horror classic. Craven’s 1991 feature is a masterfully crafted urban horror story that is also exceptionally well written for the genre. The film offers up plenty of terrifying sequences, sadistically dark comedic moments, and a perfectly cast ensemble that delights in their over-the-top characters. It’s an endlessly re-watchable Horror treat, and fans will be overjoyed with this latest Collector’s Edition release from Scream Factory.

Poindexter “Fool” Williams (Brandon Adams) and his family are the last remaining residents of their rundown apartment complex in Los Angeles. His mother is sick and requires hospital treatment that they’re unable to afford. It certainly doesn’t help their predicament when they receive an eviction notice from their mysterious landlords, the Robesons. When his sister’s boyfriend Leroy (Ving Rhames) tells Fool about the rumored hoard of gold that the Robeson’s have stashed away somewhere in their old creepy house, they concoct a plan to steal it from the greedy old couple. After all, with that amount of gold at his disposal, Fool could certainly afford to pay for his mother’s medical care and save their apartment.

Suffice to say, Fool and Leroy’s attempted robbery goes horribly wrong, trapping Fool in the disturbing house of the utterly psychotic Robeson’s. With no possibility of escape, the deranged “Daddy” and “Momma” Robeson on his trail, and cannibalistic offspring living inside the walls of the house, Fool’s only hope of survival is Alice, the Robeson’s sheltered daughter.

The People Under the Stairs delights at every twisted turn with fantastic makeup and special effects work from KNB EFX, a moody score from Don Peake, and an impressive production design. Twin Peaks’ Everett McGill and Wendy Robie turn in wickedly terrifying performances as the Robesons, and young Brandon Adams is one of the most likeable child actors in Horror movie history. I truly enjoyed revisiting the film on this brand new Collector’s Edition from Scream Factory.

Video Quality:

Scream Factory delivers The People Under the Stairs onto Blu-Ray with the same fantastic transfer that accompanied the previous Universal release. The urban (and suburban) setting exhibits plenty of depth and clarity, with a beautiful color scheme that is respectful to the original theatrical presentation. The level of detail in facial features, clothing, and the terrifying house itself is spectacular. Black levels are solid, and there are no artifacts or damage to the print to report. Fans will be delighted with this clean, crisp, transfer of a modern-day Horror classic.

Audio Quality:

The 5.1 DTS-HD audio track is another standout addition to this Blu-Ray release. Everything from the unsettling score to dialogue and sound effects comes through very clean and clearly in HD surround. There are plenty of scary moments that definitely gave me a “jump” on this mix, and the audio is perfectly captured in tremendous detail across all channels.

Special Features:

Scream Factory has provided fans of The People Under the Stairs with an incredible selection of bonus features for this Blu-Ray release. This is truly a Collector’s Edition folks! Here’s a breakdown of what’s included:

  • Audio Commentaries (2): There are two commentaries to choose from on this Blu-Ray edition including one featuring the Director himself, Wes Craven, and the other featuring Brandon Adams, A.J. Langer, Sean Whalen, and Yan Burg.
  • House Mother with Wendy Robie– This incredible interview from Red Shirt Pictures lasts nearly 20 minutes and features actress Wendy Robie (“Woman”/Mrs. Robeson) discussing how she became involved with The People Under the Stairs, her background in Shakespeare and television roles, how the character of Hannibal Lecter inspired her audition, and the psychological profile she assumed to play the role of “woman.” Wendy discusses working with Wes Craven as well here, and further emphasizes the Director’s noteworthy likeability. My favorite sections of the interview have Wendy sharing stories from the late-night shooting schedule and the cast and crew deliriously cracking up after takes. Once again, this is a wonderful addition from Red Shirt Pictures to this Blu-Ray release.
  • What Lies Beneath: The Effects of The People Under the StairsThis 15 minute featurette from Red Shirt Pictures has KNB EFX pioneers Howard Berger, Robert Kurtzman, and Greg Nicotero (of The Walking Dead fame) discussing their involvement on The People Under the Stairs special effects work. I always find featurettes on makeup effects fascinating, and this one is no exception! The behind-the-scenes footage combined with the recollections of the KNB folks makes for some truly captivating material. I loved hearing about the development of these fantastic effects; from Ving Rhames’ life cast to Sean Whalen’s unique makeup, there is plenty to salivate over here for Horror fans!
  • House of Horrors: With Director of Photography Sandi Sissel- This is yet another great interview from Red Shirt Pictures, coming in at over 16 minutes and featuring DP Sandi Sissel discussing her work on the film. Sandi’s career, starting out in documentaries and eventually making her way to big budget productions, offers up plenty of great stories.
  • Settling the Score (with Don Peake)– This 10 minute interview with composer Don Peake offers up some insightful stories regarding the score for The People Under the Stairs. Don’s career is discussed in depth, beginning with his musical experience in High School and joining The Everly Brothers in the 1960’s to working in Hollywood. A very interesting guy with plenty of fascinating tales to tell.
  • Behind the Scenes Footage– Nearly 7 minutes of behind-the-scenes footage from Greg Nicotero include the oft-discussed disemboweling scene and makeup preparation for the actors involved.
  • Theatrical Trailer- The original theatrical trailer for the film runs just over a minute and is just as enticing for potential viewers as it was back in 1991. The tagline for the film spoken over the terrifying imagery perfectly captures the tone. It’s a short one, but sometimes less is more.
  • TV Spots- Just over a minute of select TV spots from the film’s theatrical campaign.
  • Vintage Making of Featurette- This is actually just under 4 minutes of promotional material for the film partnered with select scenes. I especially enjoyed the black and white “vintage” footage of the actors discussing their roles.
  • Original Storyboards- Just about 7 minutes worth of storyboards for various sequences from the film. You have to appreciate the amount of effort that goes into planning these unique and elaborate shots!
  • Still Gallery- Roughly 4 minutes of behind-the-scenes photos and production stills from the making of The People Under the Stairs.

The Packaging:

As you can see from the “Unboxing” pictures below, this Blu-Ray edition from Scream Factory features what is quite possibly my favorite Scream Factory artwork yet! Justin Osbourne was commissioned to create this piece, which truly captures the atmosphere of the film. The purple color scheme is gorgeous, and the likeness of the actors is absolutely spot-on! On the reverse of the packaging you’ll find a plot synopsis, a list of special features, technical specifications, and select production stills from the film. On the interior of the slipcover is the standard Blu-Ray case, which has reversible artwork featuring the original theatrical poster for the film. The interior of the case features the Blu-Ray disc, also featuring artwork from the theatrical poster. This is absolutely one of my personal favorite packaging jobs from Scream Factory! Bravo.

 

The People Under the Stairs: Collector's Edition (reverse)

The People Under the Stairs: Collector’s Edition (reverse)

The People Under the Stairs: Collector's Edition (interior)

The People Under the Stairs: Collector’s Edition (interior)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Report:

The People Under the Stairs is a modern day Horror classic. The film offers up plenty of terrifying sequences, sadistically dark comedic moments, and a perfectly cast ensemble that delights in their over-the-top characters. It’s an endlessly re-watchable Horror treat, and fans will be overjoyed with this latest Collector’s Edition release from Scream Factory. This Blu-Ray edition features outstanding video and audio quality, and arrives loaded with fascinating special features for Horror fans. Justin Osbourne’s amazing cover art is yet another added bonus to what may be one of Scream Factory’s finest releases to date. Highly recommended!

Yours Truly,

Doctor Macabre


Ghost Town Blu-Ray Review

Blu-Ray Review- Ghost Town

Distributor: Scream Factory

Street Date: July 28th 2015

Technical Specifications: 1080P Video, Color, 1.78:1 Aspect Ratio, DTS-HD Master Audio Mono

Runtime: 85 Minutes

Ghost Town (Scream Factory)

Ghost Town (Scream Factory)

The Film:

Empire Pictures and Charles Band’s 1988 production of Ghost Town contains too many laugh-out-loud “what the fuck am I watching?” moments to count. When bride-to-be Kate Barrett goes missing in a desert town (honestly…who keeps their wedding dress in the backseat of a top-down convertible in the desert?), the local Sheriff’s Deputy (Franc Luz) Langley is assigned to track her down. A rough sandstorm is the apparent cause, but we (the viewers) know that a ghastly western outlaw apparition on horseback has carried her off.

As Langley begins his search, the same outlaw apparition quickly decimates his vehicle, leaving him stranded and desperate in the scorching desert heat. Our hero stumbles across the barren landscape into an abandoned Old West town in his search to solve the mystery of Kate’s disappearance, but soon finds out, nothing is what it seems. The entire town’s inhabitants are dead, stuck in a limbo of sorts, waiting for the day when a legendary lawman will come to town and rid them of the ghostly outlaw that is keeping their souls hostage. Langley, by chance, just might be the lawman they’re looking for.

Ghost Town is a fairly enjoyable B-movie cheese-fest! The story is unintentionally silly, with less-than-stellar acting ability all around, exaggerated line delivery, and questionable editing choices. If it wasn’t for its lack of repeat-watch value, Ghost Town would almost qualify for the “so bad it’s good” stamp of approval. For those that enjoy bad movies, there is no denying that the film delivers the goods. I will say that the special effects aren’t half bad, with a few select gore shots and makeup details that are impressive given the obvious budget restraints. Do I recommend it? Sure. Ghost Town isn’t a terrible way to waste away a rainy afternoon, and cheesy movie fans will delight in the film’s unintentional comedy.

Video Quality:

Scream Factory has given Ghost Town an incredibly solid transfer onto the Blu-Ray format! It’s almost too good given the film’s B-movie laugh-fest quality (joking of course). The print is very clean, free from defects, and offers up some beautiful natural film grain without any evidence of manipulation. The dusty ghost town exhibits a depth and lifelike quality in High Definition, and facial features and clothing material are captured in stunning clarity. There are a few scattered shots with artifacts, and a handful of scenes that exhibit a “jumpy” quality (likely a stabilization issue from the source), but Ghost Town overall looks fantastic on the format!

Audio Quality:

The 2.0 DTS-HD audio track is another fine aspect to this Blu-Ray release. Dialogue always comes through clean and clear, music and sound effects are rather dynamic for a mono track, and there are no hiccups or other distortions in sound throughout the experience. The cheesy score sounds especially great here!

Special Features:

There are no special features included on this Blu-Ray release for Ghost Town. For many of us, having the film on the High Definition format is a special treat in and of itself. Others may be disappointed with the lack of extras.

The Packaging:

This Blu-Ray edition from Scream Factory features the original theatrical poster design for the film on its cover. I love the classic Western “pistols at dawn” pose paired with the menace of the skeleton cowboy. The artistic touches of the town’s buildings fading away and the skeleton’s shadow in the foreground are appreciated. On the reverse of the case you’ll find a plot synopsis, technical specifications, and select production stills from the film. Inside of the case is the Blu-Ray disc as well as some nice reversible artwork that fans can choose to display instead of the theatrical poster art.

 

Ghost Town (reverse)

Ghost Town (reverse)

Ghost Town (interior)

Ghost Town (interior)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Report:

Ghost Town is a fairly enjoyable B-movie cheese-fest! The story is unintentionally silly, with less-than-stellar acting ability all around, exaggerated line delivery, and questionable editing choices. If it wasn’t for its lack of repeat-watch value, Ghost Town would almost qualify for the “so bad it’s good” stamp of approval. For those that enjoy bad movies, there is no denying that the film delivers the goods. The Blu-Ray from Scream Factory boasts very impressive video and audio quality, making for an enjoyable home theater experience for Horror fans. The lack of special features may be disappointing for some, but most of us are satisfied enough to finally own a rare treat like this one on the High Definition format. Western Horror films are hard to come by, and though you have to be in the right mood to appreciate its B-movie charms, Ghost Town on Blu-Ray comes recommended.

Yours Truly,

Doctor Macabre


Ouija Blu-Ray Review

Blu-Ray Review- Ouija

Distributor: Universal Studios Home Entertainment

Street Date: February 3rd 2015

Technical Specifications: 1080P Video, Color, 2.40:1 Aspect Ratio, 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio

Runtime: 90 Minutes

Ouija (Universal Studios Home Entertainment)

Ouija (Universal Studios Home Entertainment)

The Film:

I would venture to say that most healthy upbringings involve some sort of journey into the spiritual world of the unknown. Whether it was clinging tightly to your group of friends as you nervously turned off the bathroom lights and chanted “Bloody Mary” in the mirror, got up the guts to walk onto the porch of the neighborhood “spooky house”, or even spent a night in a graveyard with candles and a Ouija board. Or…maybe I just had a particularly unhealthy obsession with the macabre as a youngster. All joking aside, I think most of us would agree that there was a point in our early teen years, perhaps earlier for some, where we became fascinated with what lies beyond. The history behind the Spirit board or Ouija board (as it has come to be known) is a fascinating one; from its beginnings in planchette writing in ancient China to its commercialization by Parker Brothers (later bought by Hasbro) in the late 1960’s, the controversial means of speaking to the dead have the makings of a movie written all over it. Though the concept had been explored before in films like The Exorcist and Witchboard, 2014’s Ouija from Director Stiles White goes all-out in exploiting the mysterious game on the big screen.

Ouija stars Olivia Cooke as Laine Morris, a young woman whose best friend Debbie (Shelley Hennig) has just apparently committed suicide after using a Ouija board while home alone. Unconvinced that Debbie would ever harm herself in this fashion, Laine and her friends begin to investigate the mysterious nature of her death. They hold a séance in Debbie’s home, and appear to make contact with her, allowing some comfort within the group to finally let her rest in peace. But the terror has just begun. Soon Debbie and her friends begin to experience visions, scrawled messages, and other dire warnings that lead them to believe that they have awakened something in this house that refuses to rest until it can take more lives with it.

I’ll be completely honest with you. I enjoyed the first half of Ouija quite a bit. Though there was nothing particularly original about the film’s opening or subsequent ability to draw the viewer in, it simply unfolded in a way that reminded me of cheesy 90’s Horror; a group of college-aged kids, a mysterious object, an untimely death in the group that begs to be solved. It wasn’t much, but it surprisingly captured my interest. But any positive feelings I had quickly faded soon after, when the film ventured into territory that was all too familiar and easy. The potential to scare with a film centered on spirit boards is huge, but Ouija instead relies on jump scares and formulaic plot devices that are devoid of any true fear for the viewer. The cast does well enough with the material at hand, but stumbles more than occasionally with a script that doesn’t give them much to work with. Word on the street is that Ouija suffered from multiple reshoots and studio edits that left quite a bit of footage on the cutting room floor (much of which you can see in the trailer). Hope fully someday Universal will release an Extended Cut and allow Horror fans the opportunity to gauge any lost potential.

Video Quality:

As usual, Universal has done a fine job on the video portion of this Blu-Ray edition of Ouija. The HD print features deep black levels, a remarkably clear and vibrant palette, and clarity that impresses throughout. Though I didn’t care much for the film itself, this is a nice looking Blu-Ray disc.

Audio Quality:

The 5.1 DTS-HD audio track included herein is a great example of great sound design for HD audio. The thrills and jump scares in the film (cheap as they are) work extremely well on this surround track, filling your living room with atmosphere. It’s the kind of audio track that will get you peeking up from under the covers fairly quickly. Well done!

Special Features:

Universal Studios Home Entertainment has provided fans of Ouija with a limited selection of bonus features to accompany this Blu-Ray release. Here’s a breakdown of what’s included:

  • The Spirit Board: An Evolution- This roughly 4 minute featurette has the cast and crew discussing the titular board, its origins, and the horror elements they utilized during the making of the film.
  • Adapting the Fear- This featurette runs just under 4 minutes and features the cast and crew discussing their personal history involving Ouija boards as well as stories they heard that inspired the screenwriting process. They also share some spooky moments that happened on set while filming.
  • Icon of the Unknown- This featurette runs exactly 4 minutes and features some historians and experts discussing how the Ouija board works.

The Packaging:

As you can see from the “Unboxing” pictures below, this Blu-Ray edition from Universal Studios Home Entertainment features a very nice matte finish slipcover complete with embossed logo. The design itself reminds one of the texture of an actual Ouija board, which is a nice touch. On the reverse of the packaging you’ll find a brief plot synopsis, a list of bonus features, technical specifications, and details regarding the Blu-Ray exclusives featured on this release. On the interior of the packaging are two fairly plain discs for the Blu-Ray and DVD as well as the Ultraviolet Digital Copy Code insert. I would love to see Universal finally explore disc design options other than plain blue and silver.

Ouija (reverse)

Ouija (reverse)

Ouija (interior)

Ouija (interior)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Report:

Growing up with a fascination of the spiritual realm and all things macabre, I enjoyed my fair share of dark and stormy nights with a Ouija board and lit candles with my group of friends. The very thought of a movie centered on the concept of spirit boards seemed very exciting. Unfortunately, Ouija falls apart with an uninspired script, cheap thrills, and nothing in particular to set it apart from the myriad of repetitive Horror films these days. The good news here is that the Blu-Ray from Universal Studios Home Entertainment features strong video and perfectly captured audio design on the disc. The special features are light at only 12 minutes total. If you’re like me and were looking forward to a Horror film that would finally get the world of Ouija right, this certainly isn’t it.

Yours Truly,

Doctor Macabre


Starry Eyes Blu-Ray Review

Blu-Ray Review- Starry Eyes

Distributor: Dark Sky Films/MPI Home Video

Street Date: February 3rd 2015

Technical Specifications: 1080P Video, Color, 2.40:1 Aspect Ratio, 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio

Runtime: 96 Minutes

Starry Eyes (Dark Sky Films)

Starry Eyes (Dark Sky Films)

The Film:

Kevin Kolsch and Dennis Widmyer’s Starry Eyes is a Cronenbergian Horror Fantasy centered on the dark side of Hollywood and the depths of despair one woman puts herself through to achieve stardom. It’s a haunting and unnerving fable with an incredible breakout performance from Alex Essoe, a brilliantly composed score from Jonathan Snipes, and plenty of chilling images and memorable gross-out moments that will be difficult to shake.

In the film, Alex Essoe plays Sarah, an aspiring actress who works at Big Taters (a clever Hooters-esque salute) by day and attends acting classes and auditions by night. Sarah lives with her roommate Tracy (Amanda Fuller), the only friend in her life that appears supportive of her aspirations in a group full of wannabe filmmakers and toxic females seeking to bring Sarah down with passive-aggressive commentary on her dream-seeking goals.

Sarah’s life seemingly changes for the better when she auditions for an upcoming Horror film titled The Silver Scream from Astraeus Pictures, but even when she completely nails the audition with a solid performance and complete line memorization, she fails to impress the casting directors. Fed up with her apparent failure, Sarah throws a messy, banshee-crying, hair-pulling fit in the bathroom of the building, only to be overheard by the female casting director, who invites her back to the audition room to have a similar meltdown.

Sarah receives a callback, and this time the casting directors want to film her naked on camera, and a subsequent callback allows her to meet the owner of Astraeus Pictures, but Sarah finally has had enough when he propositions her for the lead role in exchange for sexual favors. At first, Sarah is disgusted and repelled by the man, but soon believes that she has made a mistake and asks for a second chance at stardom, even if it involves degrading her self-worth. When Sarah awakens the next morning, she’s a changed woman, but not anywhere close to the way she expected. As Sarah begins to rot from the inside out, we learn the true intentions behind the sadistic folks at Astraeus Pictures.

I hesitate to say anything more about Starry Eyes and allow you, the prospective viewer, to enjoy it in all of its macabre glory. As a lover of classic Horror, I’m always a little skeptical going into modern day genre offerings, but the filmmakers behind Starry Eyes have crafted a truly eerie and methodically unnerving film that comes highly recommended. Alex Essoe, in particular, turns in a performance that is impressively raw and realistic (even in a fantasy scenario) and deserves every accolade she has received. Despite an ending that, in my opinion, goes a bit overboard with the gore for a film that had been stylishly creepy until that point, Starry Eyes is the first modern Horror film in some time that has captured both my attention and admiration.

Video Quality:

This Blu-Ray edition from Dark Sky Films features a very strong video presentation with deep black levels, authentically gritty visuals respecting the theatrical source print, and no signs of digital scrubbing or unwanted artifacts. Well done!

Audio Quality:

The 5.1 DTS-HD audio track regularly balances dialogue, the wonderfully eerie musical score from Jonathan Snipes, and background sound design with ease, making for a terrific home audio experience. The score reminds me of some of John Carpenter’s wonderful soundtracks over the years, and sounds great in HD surround.

Special Features:

Dark Sky Films has provided fans of Starry Eyes with select bonus features to accompany this Blu-Ray release. Here’s a breakdown of what’s included:

  • Commentary- Writer/Director’s Dennis Widmyer and Kevin Kolsch along with Producer Travis Stevens sit down for this insightful commentary that offers behind-the-scenes anecdotes including how the concept and story came together, production locales and their intentions, and much more.
  • Deleted Scenes- Some random deleted scenes that were definitely better left on the cutting room floor as they wouldn’t have added much to a picture that flows rather smoothly in the final product. There’s a scene with Sarah’s room shaking as she wakes up from a dream, Sarah driving with Tracy in her car, some party moments and drunken discussions, Sarah jogging, an extended audition callback, more jogging, Sarah leaving the Astraeus Pictures’ owner’s house, some extended vomiting and lip-pealing, and more.
  • Jonathan Snipes Music Video- Not your typical music video, but some intercut scenes of Jonathan Snipes mixing the score on his computer along with footage from the film.
  • Alex Essoe Audition Video- An impressive audition tape from Alex Essoe who seemed like a natural fit for the role right from the start.
  • Behind-the-Scenes Photo Gallery- Nearly ten minutes of behind-the-scenes photos from the making of the film.
  • Trailer- The theatrical trailer from the film.

The Packaging:

As you can see from the “Unboxing” pictures below, this Blu-Ray edition from Dark Sky Films features some creepy cover artwork that gives potential viewers just a hint of insight into the subject matter of the film. On the reverse of the packaging you’ll find a brief plot synopsis, along with a list of special features and technical specifications. The simple matte finish disc design mimics the cover of the Blu-Ray edition, and there is also some reversible artwork for those interested.

Starry Eyes (reverse)

Starry Eyes (reverse)

Starry Eyes (interior)

Starry Eyes (interior)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Report:

As a classic Horror aficionado, I’m always a little skeptical going into modern day genre offerings, but the filmmakers behind Starry Eyes have crafted a truly eerie and methodically unnerving film that comes highly recommended. This Cronenbergian Horror fantasy from Kevin Kolsch and Dennis Widmyer is a haunting and unnerving fable with an incredible breakout performance from Alex Essoe, a brilliantly composed score from Jonathan Snipes, and plenty of chilling images and memorable gross-out moments that will be difficult to shake. The Blu-Ray edition from Dark Sky Films features a very solid video and audio presentation along with some fun special features for fans of the film. Highly Recommended!

Yours Truly,

Doctor Macabre


Annabelle Blu-Ray Review

Blu-Ray Review- Annabelle

Distributor: Warner Bros. Home Entertainment

Street Date: January 20th 2015

Technical Specifications: 1080P Video, Color, 2.40:1 Aspect Ratio, 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio

Runtime: 98 Minutes

Annabelle (Warner Bros. Home Entertainment)

Annabelle (Warner Bros. Home Entertainment)

The Film:

When The Conjuring was released in 2013, it made me believe that quality modern day Horror films could still be made in this day and age. I’m a classic Horror fan…an admirer of everything from the Universal Monsters to Hammer Films and even the cheesy cult-classic slashers of the 80’s. But modern Horror has left me wanting so much more. Gone are the days of unsettling genre pictures filled with style and atmosphere that truly terrified audiences, and unfortunately, what we’ve been left with for the past twenty years would mostly fit into the “torture porn” category.

But James Wan crafted The Conjuring with grace and style, a motion picture filled with atmosphere, dedicated performances, and a throwback aura that mirrored that of the great Horror entries from the 1970’s (The Exorcist, The Amityville Horror, etc.). When I heard that Warner Bros. planned to make a spin-off prequel featuring Annabelle (a doll expertly yet briefly utilized in The Conjuring), my hopes were high. Unfortunately without the assured direction of James Wan and a direct-to-video feel this time around, Annabelle fails to conjure up the scares of its predecessor.

In the film we meet Mia and John Form (Annabelle Wallis, Ward Horton), a young married couple who have recently settled down in Santa Monica, California. The couple is expecting their first child soon as John makes his way through medical school and Mia tends to the house by day (this is the 1960’s after all). When the next door neighbors’ cult-member daughter returns home after running away years prior, she kills her parents and attacks the Form’s in the middle of the night, possessing the Annabelle doll before she dies in a hail of Police gunfire.

Sometime later Mia and John relocate to an apartment in Pasadena with their baby girl Leah, but the Annabelle doll that John discarded at their old house has somehow found its way into one of their moving boxes. As you would expect given her history, Annabelle and the demon that uses her as a conduit wreak havoc on the Form’s and their baby daughter. With the help of a local priest (Tony Amendola) and a bookstore employee with a tragic past (Alfre Woodard), Mia and John attempt to rid their home of this evil once and for all.

Annabelle is not without its share of jump-scares and creepy moments, but they are too few and far between for a film of this length, like clever architectural design choices on a building with a crumbling foundation. The story itself and the events that unfold are simply too familiar and borrowed from other, better films. The performances are all very earnest, especially from Annabelle Wallis and Alfre Woodard, but they fail to rescue the film from its sheer lack of originality. I do hope that with James Wan back in the director’s chair for the upcoming The Conjuring: The Enfield Poltergeist, we’ll get a stylish return back to feeling of the first film, as Annabelle unfortunately left me unfulfilled.

Video Quality:

This Blu-Ray edition from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment features a very nice high definition video presentation with incredibly solid black levels, plenty of pristine fine object detail to behold, and a color palette that is pleasing to the eye. There isn’t a single instance of dirt, debris, or artifacts throughout, making for a very clean and strong presentation.

Audio Quality:

The 5.1 DTS-HD audio regularly balances dialogue, the creepy musical score, and background effects with ease, making for a terrific audio experience at home. The few jump scares the film has to offer are very effective on this surround track, and again, Warner Bros. has done a great job on the technical side of things.

Special Features:

Warner Bros. Home Entertainment has provided fans of Annabelle with some frightful bonus features to accompany this Blu-Ray release. Here’s a breakdown of what’s included:

  • The Curse of Annabelle- Running about 5 ½ minutes, this short featurette focuses on the inception of this spin-off entry and the true story that inspired both films featuring the now-famous Annabelle doll that currently resides in the Warren Occult museum. Cast and crew discuss their fascination with Ed and Lorraine Warren’s careers, as well as some spooky shenanigans that happened behind-the-scenes of the film.
  • Bloody Tears of Possession- This one also runs about 5 ½ minutes and details the cinematography and camera work involved in the making of the film. Much is discussed about trying to capture a suspenseful atmosphere with innovative camerawork and a particularly long-shot during the initial assault on the Form’s house in Santa Monica.
  • Dolls of the Demon- This featurette runs just over 4 minutes and centers on the Annabelle doll herself, along with some discussion about various dolls in Horror cinema and their seemingly innocent nature that somehow brings the goose-bumps.
  • A Demonic Process- Another nearly 5 minute featurette that focuses on the demon of the film and his gargoyle-esque look from the folks at KNB effects. The composer for the film (Joseph Bishara), who has also played the demons in both Insidious films and The Conjuring, also plays the demon here. We get some footage of the sculpting and makeup application process which is pretty fun.
  • Deleted Scenes- Included here are 8 different scenes that were deleted from the film including: Meet Fuller the Landlord, Baby Bath/Fuller Fixes the Sink, Bugs in a Bottle, Infestation, Attack, Scratches & Father Perez’s arrival, Mia Wakes Up, and Demonic Kidnapping/Carnage. Everything is presented in High Definition and has final music/editing cues in place, leading us to believe that these scenes were excised at the last minute. Some of the cut scenes are surprisingly effective, and others involving a creepy landlord and bugs in the baby’s bottle were definitely better left on the cutting room floor.

The Packaging:

As you can see from the “Unboxing” pictures below, this Blu-Ray combo pack edition from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment features artwork that mimics the theatrical poster campaign with Annabelle herself on the slipcover. It’s an effective tease for the film, but I do wish that Warner Bros. had made it a lenticular one to pair nicely with their awesome lenticular “clap” cover for The Conjuring on Blu-Ray. On the back of the packaging you’ll find a very brief plot synopsis, a list of special features, and technical specifications. Inside of the case are two very plain black discs; one Blu-ray and one DVD, along with an insert featuring the Ultraviolet digital copy code and an advertisement for the upcoming game Dying Light.

Annabelle (reverse)

Annabelle (reverse)

Annabelle (interior)

Annabelle (interior)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Report:

Though I truly loved The Conjuring for its throwback 70’s style, genuinely unsettling atmosphere, and effective chills set against a true story, Annabelle fails to conjure up the scares of its predecessor. This spin-off entry is not without its share of jump-scares and creepy moments, but they are too few and far between for a film of this length and budget, like clever architectural design choices on a building with a crumbling foundation. The good news here is that the Blu-Ray disc video and audio quality are expertly crafted by the folks at Warner Bros., making for a great home viewing experience. Fans of the film will appreciate the special features that, while short, offer up some fun behind-the-scenes anecdotes for the film. I really wanted to like Annabelle, but unfortunately she was better left as a singular creepy element to a much better film.

Yours Truly,

Doctor Macabre

Annabelle Promotional Doll with Blu-Ray Combo Pack

Annabelle Promotional Doll with Blu-Ray Combo Pack